Monday, May 25, 2015
NOAA scientists tackle mystery of nighttime thunderstorms

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

NOAA scientists tackle mystery of nighttime thunderstorms

This summer, more than 20 NOAA scientists will stay up late to learn why some thunderstorms form and grow at night, without the energy from the sun's heat. They will be participating in the Plains Elevated Convection At Night (PECAN), a large, intensive field campaign to collect data before and during nighttime thunderstorms in the western Great Plains from June 1 to July 15. 

Research needed to resolve connections between Arctic warming and severe weather

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Research needed to resolve connections between Arctic warming and severe weather

It is too soon to know if recent extreme cold weather such as the last two East Coast winters are linked to Arctic climate warming, according to new research published in the Journal of Climate by James Overland of NOAA, and other authors from North America, Asia and Europe.

NOAA Scientists Provide Expertise for the $2 Million Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE

Thursday, May 14, 2015

NOAA Scientists Provide Expertise for the $2 Million Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE

We caught up recently with Remy Okazaki at NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle.  Remy is a chemist with the University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean (JISAO) working with PMEL’s carbon team on the $2 million Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE, a global competition to advance ocean pH sensing technology to better understand, measure and address ocean acidification. On May 14, XPRIZE will begin the final phase of testing in deep water off the northern coast of Oahu, Hawaii, aboard the R/V Kilo Moana research vessel.
New research will help forecast bad ozone days over the western U.S.

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

New research will help forecast bad ozone days over the western U.S.

New research published in Nature Communications led by Meiyun Lin of NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory and NOAA’s cooperative institute at Princeton University, reveals a strong connection between high ozone days in the western U.S. during late spring and La Niña, an ocean-atmosphere phenomena that affects global weather patterns.
Greenhouse gas benchmark reached

Wednesday, May 06, 2015

Greenhouse gas benchmark reached

For the first time since we began tracking carbon dioxide in the global atmosphere, the monthly global average concentration of this greenhouse gas surpassed 400 parts per million in March 2015,  according to NOAA’s latest results.

 

Quantifying the emissions from a large ethanol refinery

Tuesday, May 05, 2015

Quantifying the emissions from a large ethanol refinery

After quantifying the airborne emissions from the nation’s third largest ethanol refinery, a team led by NOAA and University of ColoradoBoulder researchers has found that for some gases, refining ethanol releases more to the atmosphere than previously thought—and in some cases more than is ultimately released by burning the fuel in vehicles. The emissions can contribute to the formation of ozone, a regulated pollutant that can affect human health. Results are published in a paper published online by Journal of Geophysical Research.

What does “normal” mean anyway?

Tuesday, May 05, 2015

What does “normal” mean anyway?

In the Great Lakes region, memories of the brutal winter of 2013-2014 are still fresh in residents’ minds. That winter brought very cold surface water temperatures and high ice cover well into the 2014 spring. Coupled with a record-setting water level surge of nearly three feet between January 2013 and December 2014, people who live along the shore of Lake Michigan have been wondering whether this is the “new normal” for the lake.

 

American Chemical Society honors measurement set at NOAA observatory

Thursday, April 23, 2015

American Chemical Society honors measurement set at NOAA observatory

The American Chemical Society will designate the Keeling Curve – a long-term record of rising carbon dioxide in the planet’s atmosphere -- as a National Historic Chemical Landmark in a ceremony April 30 at NOAA’s Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii.


For the first time, Saildrones explore the Bering Sea

Sunday, April 19, 2015

For the first time, Saildrones explore the Bering Sea

On April 22, two autonomous surface vehicles equipped with meteorological and oceanographic sensors will be released for the first time in the Bering Sea by NOAA’s Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL). Saildrones have the capacity to increase observational infrastructure in remote and hostile polar regions where ship time and human labor is costly and potentially hazardous. The ongoing development of Saildrones is a collaborative effort of researchers at PMEL, the Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean (JISAO) at the University of Washington, the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and Saildrone Inc.
NOAA to explore depths of Caribbean Sea

Wednesday, April 08, 2015

NOAA to explore depths of Caribbean Sea

Beginning April 10, scientists aboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer will begin a series of 20 dives to investigate previously unseen depths of the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean – and the public can follow along online.

During dives that are expected to go as deep as 3.7 miles, a sophisticated unmanned submarine, called a remotely operated vehicle, or ROV, will broadcast live video from the seafloor, allowing anyone with Internet access to watch the expedition as it unfolds.

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