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Ready for summer heat? Study finds new primary driver of extreme Texas heat waves

Ready for summer heat? Study finds new primary driver of extreme Texas heat waves

Summer is finally here, and that means families all over the country are starting to fire up the barbecue grill and open up their beach chairs. But summertime also means hot weather — sometimes dangerously hot.

June 28, 2018 0 Comments
NOAA and international partners plan upgrade of global weather and ocean observing system

NOAA and international partners plan upgrade of global weather and ocean observing system

NOAA met with ocean observations experts from six nations and 13 global organizations in May 2017 in Honolulu, Hawaii, to plan for the redesign of the Tropical Pacific Observing System by the year 2020 (TPOS 2020). 

June 26, 2017 0 Comments
Ocean temperatures may hold key to predicting tornado outbreaks

Ocean temperatures may hold key to predicting tornado outbreaks

Tornados are one of nature’s most destructive forces. Currently, our capacity to predict tornados and other severe weather risks does not extend beyond seven days. In a recent paper published in Environmental Research Letters, scientists with NOAA and the University of Miami identified how patterns in the spring phases of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), coupled with variability in North Atlantic sea surface temperatures, could help predict U.S. regional tornado outbreaks. 

April 11, 2016 0 Comments
NOAA launches unprecedented effort to discover how El Niño affects weather

NOAA launches unprecedented effort to discover how El Niño affects weather

NOAA scientists and partners have embarked on a land, sea, and air campaign in the tropical Pacific to study the current El Niño and gather data in an effort to improve weather forecasts thousands of miles away.
February 5, 2016 0 Comments
Texas heat wave of 2011 largely caused by drought, ocean temperatures, says NOAA-led study

Texas heat wave of 2011 largely caused by drought, ocean temperatures, says NOAA-led study

A new NOAA study finds that La Niña-related sea-surface temperature conditions were the most important factor leading to the drying out in Texas and the U.S. Southern Plains last year.
November 15, 2012 0 Comments
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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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